Speed Up and Increase Trade, or We'll Derail Our Growth and Influence Fast-Track to Freer Trade Promises Bumpy Ride

By Bob Graham and Mike DeWine | The Christian Science Monitor, September 19, 1997 | Go to article overview

Speed Up and Increase Trade, or We'll Derail Our Growth and Influence Fast-Track to Freer Trade Promises Bumpy Ride


Bob Graham and Mike DeWine, The Christian Science Monitor


Gerald Ford had it. Jimmy Carter had it. Ronald Reagan had it. George Bush had it. Now Bill Clinton wants it - and Congress can stimulate long-term economic growth and enhance United States leadership around the globe by giving it to him.

"It" is fast-track authority, a streamlined process for negotiating and approving international trade agreements. Fast-track is a trade-off - not a blank check. The White House submits to strict congressional parameters and enforcement standards in the negotiation of trade agreements. In return, Congress agrees to approve or reject accords without subjecting them to amendments.

President Clinton's formal request for fast-track authority this week promises a spirited House and Senate debate. The main issue of contention is economics. Opponents of fast-track claim that increased trade also increases the movement of jobs to other countries. For some industries, this claim has merit. Despite our favorable business climate and the fact that American workers are among the most productive in the world, some companies have used expanded trade to relocate to lower-cost areas. But the beneficial economic effects of trade, over time, overwhelmingly outweigh any short-term consequences. Consider these staggering numbers: Since 1988, nearly 70 percent of US economic growth has come from the export of goods and services. Nearly 1 in 5 jobs in today's work force is supported by trade. The political argument from some legislators against fast-track is that it places too much economic power in the president's hands, and overly constricts Congress's ability to influence trade accords. If anything, fast-track strikes an appropriate balance between Congress's need to oversee the executive branch, and the president's authority to make treaties. It gives Congress the final say on American trade policy, yet recognizes that many trading partners wouldn't even come to the table if US negotiators had to consult with 100 senators and 435 representatives on the wording of every clause. Since World War II, the US has been the undisputed leader in the global effort to liberalize trade, reduce tariffs, and open markets.

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Speed Up and Increase Trade, or We'll Derail Our Growth and Influence Fast-Track to Freer Trade Promises Bumpy Ride
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