Business School Case Studies to Focus More on Women

The Christian Science Monitor, November 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Business School Case Studies to Focus More on Women


When business school students examine case studies of the workplace, more often than not, they're studies of businesses run by men.

Although more men run American companies than do women, far more women are corporate managers than the current business curriculums would suggest.

Armed with a grant from a national organization of women business executives, Harvard Business School in Cambridge, Mass., will begin teaching more case studies featuring senior women managers, school officials said last week. The case-study method, which is used by many business schools, draws on firsthand accounts of management situations, from problems with operating policies to accounting methods to market research. Harvard professors said only a fraction of their current cases revolve around women managers. The university sells about 6 million copies of the studies it produces to business schools worldwide each year. Marjorie Alfus, a former executive at Kmart who came up with the idea of the grant, said she wanted to influence business through education and not simply through networking. …

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Business School Case Studies to Focus More on Women
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