Internet Investing - Fast, Cheap, More Control Going Online Gives Small Investors Some of the Tips and Technology Once Exclusive to the Pros

By Laurent Belsie, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Internet Investing - Fast, Cheap, More Control Going Online Gives Small Investors Some of the Tips and Technology Once Exclusive to the Pros


Laurent Belsie, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Here's one for the history books. Remember the days of old, when you had to call your broker to get a quote on your investments or make a trade?

Remember when you waited until the evening TV news to find out what happened to the stock market?

Why, that must have been as long ago as ... the mid-1990s. All that has changed, dramatically, thanks to the Internet revolution. You can now monitor the markets and your own investments as the trading day progresses. You can can get an instant snapshot of the mutual funds in your 401(k) or 403(b) retirement account. You can check out the charts, trends, expert comments, and investment prospects for the software company run by the dad of the girl your daughter plays with at day care. You can push thousands of shares through the stock exchanges without so much as talking to another human being. Just "click here." The Internet has changed the way Americans invest and, in equally dramatic developments, changed how much they pay to make their moves. It has made them wiser, perhaps a little richer, and may attract more of them to the market. But it could also drown unwary investors with information overload and lure others to the excitement of short-term trading rather than the wisdom of long-term investing. Like the Model T and the telephone, the online revolution will most directly affect the common man. Realizing the potential for new customers, brokerage firms are rushing onto the Internet. But as Wall Street merges with the information highway, experts expect cyberspace to remake the investment world, not the other way around. Along the way, securities markets should become more open and accessible to the individual. Commissions, already falling fast, could eventually disappear, analysts say. Besides investors themselves, big winners include banks, aggressive online brokerages with strong brand-name recognition, and smaller Internet advisers and trading firms that can exploit niches. "We think there's going to be a major shift," says Blake Darcy, chief executive of DLJ Direct, the online arm of the DLJ brokerage firm in New York. "Virtually every single brokerage firm has realized it has to have an online presence." Crowding the 'info highway' "It's really the inevitable way that all people will do their investing," adds Alex Goor, executive vice president of Datek Online, a deep-discount online brokerage in Iselin, N.J. No one expects full-service brokers to fade away, but by 2002, some $688 billion will be managed in online trading accounts - five times the figure for 1997 and nearly 5 percent of the total assets in retail investment accounts, forecasts Forrester Research, a market-research firm in Cambridge, Mass. The Internet allows investors to download reams of data. Where they once called their brokers for the latest market movements, they now grab the information themselves. "The more information you give to your customers, the more analysis investors can get on their own, and the less they need a full-service broker," says Mr.

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