Wilkinson Hosts Media Shop for Nonprofit Organizations

By Gilmore, Joan | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 1, 1985 | Go to article overview

Wilkinson Hosts Media Shop for Nonprofit Organizations


Gilmore, Joan, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Biggest complaint from non-profit agencies - and other organizations, too - is lack of publicity or news coverage. "We can't seem to get any coverage," they wail.

Well, Carol Wilkinson, director of public affairs at KOCO-TV, hopes to help them.

On Tuesday, Sept. 17, her station, through the cooperation of the Gannett Foundation and the Foundation for American Communication, will offer a free media workshop for all non-profit organizationsin Oklahoma City.

"Two conference times are set," Carol said. Both will be in the Kirkpatrick Center Conference Room, 5200 N. Eastern Ave., with one scheduled from 9 a.m. until noon and the other from 1 p.m. until 4p.m.

Wilkinson says that the Foundation for American Communication is a national educational institute established in 1976 to improve the media communication process in the U.S. She says nationally recognized experts in media communications will be among the speakers, as well as local media experts. Workshop attendees also will receive free copies of "Media Resource Guide: How to Tell Your Story."

Formal invitations to the workshop will go out the end of this month. . .

- Guest speaker at the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce luncheon today will be Dr. William G. Thurman, president of the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

This will be the Chamber's annual meeting with the Oklahoma Health Sciences Foundation. Lee Allan Smith will preside at the luncheon at the Sheraton Century Center Hotel.

Also honored at the luncheon will be Mrs. Louise Fluke, designer of the Oklahoma flag. Her design for the flag was adopted April 2, 1925.

Bill Thurman, who has headed the OMRF for the past six years, also serves as a professor of pediatrics at the college of medicine of the University of Oklahoma. Formerly he served as provost and vice president of medical affairs at the OU Health Sciences Center. . .

- And, speaking of the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, the name Lara Teeter comes to mind.

Lara is a talented actor/singer/dancer whose parents, the Bonner Teeters, live in Oklahoma City. Lara lives in New York now where he just finished starring in "On Your Toes."

What brings him to mind is that while we were in New York last, we taped Lara for a video public service announcement on behalf of the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation. The spot was taped across from the Plaza Hotel near Central Park. Although we didn't plan it that way, the musical background turned out to be a small jazz band playing for donations.

Lara was taped dancing across the little plaza where he gracefully leaped upon a park bench to do his spiel. He did it well, of course. But what was really delightful was that right at the very end, he raised his right hand and said "Hi, Mom!" We'll probably leave that on the video spot when it's released to area television stations early in the fall.

Incidentally, Lara isn't far from home right now. He and Oklahoma City singer/actress Billie Thrash have been doing "Promises, Promises" at the Wichita Musical Theater. . .

- Plans for Odyssey '85 are going great guns. That's the gala three-day benefit held every other year to raise money for the Oklahoma Symphony Orchestra. Theme for this year's Odyssey, scheduled Oct. 31, Nov. 1 and 2, is "Three Days on the Riviera," according to co-chairmen Mrs. John R. Rex and Mrs. Robert P. Lammerts.

The first day will feature a fashion show in St. Tropez, better known in Oklahoma City as the new Marriott Hotel. The second evening, Diamond Circle patrons - those who purchase the $1,000 per couple tickets - will be feted at a special cocktail supper at the former Hales Mansion. This will be titled "An Evening in Cannes."

The final gala, which will be have the theme of the Monte Carlo international playground, will be at the Skirvin Plaza Hotel's Grand Ballroom. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wilkinson Hosts Media Shop for Nonprofit Organizations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.