Worldwide Briefly

By Business News Wire Dispatches | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 16, 1985 | Go to article overview

Worldwide Briefly


Business News Wire Dispatches, THE JOURNAL RECORD


NEW YORK (AP) - Consumers have been giving Coca-Cola Classic a mixed reception since it has returned to groceries after sharp criticism of Coca-Cola Co.'s new Coke, according to a spot check of supermarkets across the nation.

Coca-Cola said that sales figures were unavailable at this early stage. Coca-Cola Classic should be sold nationwide by the end of the month.

""The first week, we sold them real well because everybody wanted to try them. They're really not going well right now,'' said Julius Milton, manager of the A&P supermarket at West End Mall in Atlanta, Coca-Cola's hometown.

He said some customers had complained about the taste of Classic Coke. ""They think it's different. It tastes like a different sweetener or something,'' he said.

Carlton Curtis, a spokesman for Coca-Cola, said: ""The Coca-Cola Company guarantees that Coca-Cola Classic is the original formula for Coca-Cola.''

The Washington-based Sugar Association, meanwhile, began a newspaper ad campaign Wednesday claiming that Classic Coke is not ""The Real Thing'' because it is sweetened with corn syrup instead of sugar.

However, Coca-Cola and other soft drink companies began switching from sugar to corn syrup several years ago.

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WASHINGTON (AP) - The recent slowdown in the nation's economic growth stems mostly from a gap in U.S. foreign trade, the National Association of Manufacturers says.

Had the United States done better on world markets, its growth rate since mid-1984 would be 4.9 percent instead of the actual 2.2 percent, the association said.

It noted that sales of U.S. manufacturers abroad last year were $11 billion less than in 1981, while imports had risen $51 billion.

Lawrence A. Fox, NAM's vice president for international economic affairs, said the high value of the dollar accounts for about half the trouble.

Fox outlined a trade strategy for the United States that would include a policy on exchange rates to make U.S. products more competitive, elimination of barriers to exports such as U.S. licensing restrictions on high-technology goods sent to allied countries and more subsidies for exports.

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NEW YORK (AP) - Acquisitions and mergers, whether friendly or not, are presenting outside directors with a complex and sometimes troubling range of problems and choices, a new report by abusiness research concern says.

The report, released Wednesday, distills the views of 30 unidentified corporate directors, chief executives and others who have had experience with corporate marriages. …

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