Club at Brookhaven to Offer Elite Health and Fitness Facilities

By Carter, Kim | THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 24, 1985 | Go to article overview

Club at Brookhaven to Offer Elite Health and Fitness Facilities


Carter, Kim, THE JOURNAL RECORD


fitness centers in the country, a new health facility now under construction in Norman will offer a country club-type setting combined with health and physical fitness programs designed to improve both mind and body.

The multi-million dollar health facility is in Brookhaven Village, a shopping center located at S. 36th St. and Robinson Ave.

Owners Dale and Allyson Reneau are targeting April 1 as an opening date for the 30,000-square-foot Club at Brookhaven.

The concept behind the facility has been expanded beyond many fitness centers currently open in Oklahoma, said Testing Director Dawn Carole Harris.

"We are taking the best of the Houstonian in Houston, Cooper Center in Dallas, the Methodist Hospital in Houston and many of the elite clubs in progressive cities and combining it into the most comprehensive, up-to-date health and fitness facility in this state," she said.

Harris said the club's testing program will separate it from other fitness centers in the Oklahoma City area.

Testing will follow the American College of Sports medical guidelines. Harris said she will be working with physicians in Norman to get their approval on the methods used.

"The testing will give us a more accurate exercise prescription," Harris said.

"We will test for flexibility, strength, body fat, cardiovascular endurance and create a prescription that specifically fits the member."

In addition to individual membership, the club will also pursue contracts with companies to test employees, Harris said.

"They can reduce health costs by taking a few preventive measures," Harris said.

Aerobic programs involve both dance and use of equipment, such as rowing machines, stationary bicycles and treadmills, designed to work the heart and lungs.

For a more relaxing atmosphere, and to beat boredom, Harris said a big screen television will be placed in the aerobics room for members to watch while they peddle, jog and row.

The design architect on the project is Rick Brown, of Rick Brown & Associates of Oklahoma City, who also designed the Waterford Hotel.

The club will provide emotional and nutritional information as well as physical training.

"We want to not only have a health facility, but we want to help people change their lifestyle," Allyson Reneau said.

As an example, Reneau said the club's staff "will not only re-teach members how to eat, but we will have place for them to eat."

A dining room is included in the plans featuring a menu of low calorie, low cholesterol and low salt foods. Reneau said she wants to show people "good eating doesn't taste bad."

Reneau believes a good health program is one that combines aerobics for the heart and lungs, weight lifting and exercise for the muscles, nutritional information for better eating habits and counseling for emotional or spiritual needs.

"We are reaching beyond the phsycial body. The person inside the body needs just as much care and tenderness as their muscles," Allyson Reneau said.

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Club at Brookhaven to Offer Elite Health and Fitness Facilities
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