Haslam for Islam? Claim Just as Ridiculous Now as Ever

By Locker, Richard | The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN), August 27, 2012 | Go to article overview

Haslam for Islam? Claim Just as Ridiculous Now as Ever


Locker, Richard, The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)


The statement: Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has made it clear by his repeated actions that he will pursue a policy that promotes the interest of Islamist (sic) and their radical ideology as long as he is governor.

The website billhislam.com

Earlier this summer, a handful of Republican Party county committees in Tennessee passed resolutions criticizing Republican Gov. Bill Haslam for hiring Samar Ali, a Muslim-American native of Waverly, Tenn.

Now, at least two new websites are attempting to perpetuate the idea that Tennessee's governor is somehow involved in a massive conspiracy to promote the interests of radical Islamic ideology, including Shariah compliant finance.

For the purposes of this item, we are going to examine a statement from billhislam.com: The Governor of the great state of Tennessee, Bill Haslam, has made it clear by his repeated actions that he will pursue a policy that promotes the interest of Islamist (sic) and their radical ideology as long as he is governor.

PolitiFact Tennessee addressed an associated claim in July when GOP state Senate candidate Woody Degan of Shelby County charged the Haslam administration was making our Economic Development Department Sharia compliant, in part by hiring Ali as international director earlier this year.

At its simplest, Sharia law is the moral code and religious law of the Islamic faith, addressing a variety of personal and secular topics. Aspects of Sharia law do govern busi

ness dealings, and some Muslims conduct business only under Sharia-compliant conditions. For example, Sharia may prohibit interest on loans, considering it usury, but may allow other lending fees in lieu of interest. But most people, constitutional scholars and others, agree that attempting to install Sharia as U.S. or Tennessee law would be unconstitutional and there's been no bills at the state level to attempt it.

The voters of Senate District 32 gave Degan a drubbing he got just 10 percent of the vote against state Sen Mark Norris, R- Collierville, in the Aug. 2 primary.

In addition to billhislam.com, there's another anonymous blog calling itself the tn Council 4 political justice, which has posted 39 newsletters on its site since April 9, focused on the purported threat of Islam on Tennessee and the Haslam administration's role in it. …

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Haslam for Islam? Claim Just as Ridiculous Now as Ever
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