Drone Aircraft Makers Respond to Growing Privacy Concerns; Trade Group Issues a Voluntary Code of Conduct, the Industry's First

By Begos, Kevin | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), July 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

Drone Aircraft Makers Respond to Growing Privacy Concerns; Trade Group Issues a Voluntary Code of Conduct, the Industry's First


Begos, Kevin, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


PITTSBURGH - A trade group for drone aircraft manufacturers and operators has released the industry's first code of conduct in response to growing privacy concerns.

The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International said Monday that the recommendations for "safe, nonintrusive operation" are meant to guide operators and reassure a public leery of the possibility of spy drones flying undetected over their homes.

"We understand as an industry that we've got a public relations problem," said Paul McDuffee, a director of the association who helped draft the recommendations.

Drones, small airplanes or helicopters operated remotely by pilots from the ground, can be equipped with sophisticated cameras and even weapons. They have been used to spy on and hunt down al- Qaida terrorists in Pakistan, but the rapidly declining size and cost of them has prompted fears that thousands could be operating in the U.S. within a decade, with little effective oversight. Some of the drones weigh just a few pounds and can fit in a person's hands.

Citizens, civil liberties groups and politicians have voiced worries that the small aircraft raise the specter of a "surveillance society." Only about 300 authorized federal permits have been issued to operate such aircraft, along with an unknown number of unlicensed amateurs, who are supposed to keep their aircraft within sight.

The new recommendations by the association, a nonprofit based in Arlington, Va., that has members in more than 60 countries, pledge to "respect the privacy of individuals" and the concerns of the public and to follow all federal, state and local laws. They also pledge to ensure that remote drone pilots are properly trained and to respect "other users of the airspace."

The language on privacy is good, but it's not enough, American Civil Liberties Union lobbyist Chris Calabrese said.

"I think it's really important that they're paying attention to privacy. That's to their credit," Calabrese said. …

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