The Rise of the 'Drawbridge Republicans'; Politics; Two Rich Candidates, Romney and Ryan, Think about the Middle Class Only under Duress; OTHER VIEWS

By Miller, Matt | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 22, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Rise of the 'Drawbridge Republicans'; Politics; Two Rich Candidates, Romney and Ryan, Think about the Middle Class Only under Duress; OTHER VIEWS


Miller, Matt, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


As Republicans head toward next week's convention, something extraordinary has come into view now that their ticket is complete.

Mitt Romney came from wealth and went on to build his own quarter- of-a-billion-dollar fortune. Paul Ryan, who has never worked a day in the private sector (outside a few months in the family firm) reports a net worth of as much as $7 million, thanks to trusts and inheritances from his and his wife's family.

Wealthy political candidates are nothing new, of course. But we've never had two wealthy candidates on a national ticket whose top priority is to reduce already low taxes on the well-to-do while raising taxes on everyone else - even as they propose to slash programs that serve the poor, or that (like college aid) create chances for the lowly born to rise.

Call them the Drawbridge Republicans. As the moniker implies, these are wealthy Republicans who have no qualms about pulling up the drawbridge behind them. Such sentiments used to be reserved for the political fringe. The most prominent example was Steve Forbes, whose twin obsessions during his vanity presidential runs in 1996 and 2000 - marginal tax rates and inflation - were precisely what you'd expect from an heir in a cocoon.

(In case you were wondering, Ronald Reagan wasn't a Drawbridge because he entered office when marginal rates, at 70 percent, were truly damaging to the economy. But as GOP business leaders now tell me privately, the Clinton-era top rate of 39.6 percent, let alone today's 35 percent, are hardly a barrier to work or investment).

Most rich Republicans who champion regressive tax plans find it necessary to at least pretend they're doing something to help average folks. John McCain, who's lived large for decades thanks to his wife's inheritance, famously had trouble keeping track of how many homes he owned - but McCain also tried bravely to create a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants. George W. Bush campaigned as a "compassionate conservative," and touted education initiatives that made this claim plausible.

Today's Drawbridge Republicans can't be bothered. Yes, when their political back is to the wall - as Romney's increasingly is - they'll slap together a page of bullet points and dub it "a plan for the middle class." But this is only under duress. The rest of the time they seem blissfully unaware of how off-key they sound. As the humorist Andy Borowitz tweeted the other day, "As a general matter, it's a bad idea to talk about austerity if you just had a horse lose in the Olympics. …

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