Republicans Retool Convention to Avoid Isaac: Who's in, Who's Out?

By Grant, David | The Christian Science Monitor, August 26, 2012 | Go to article overview

Republicans Retool Convention to Avoid Isaac: Who's in, Who's Out?


Grant, David, The Christian Science Monitor


The storm-threatened Republican National Convention will cram four planned days of political theater into three by cutting some speakers, shortening some speeches, and starting evening speechifying earlier than previously planned, a senior strategist for Mitt Romneys campaign told reporters on a conference call Sunday evening.

The convention will officially gavel in at 2 p.m. Monday but will be in session for no more than 10 minutes, said Russ Schriefer, the GOP strategist who has been the chief Romney campaign spokesman for convention logistics. The Republican National Committee called off Mondays affairs due to the impending storm Isaac, which may be a hurricane by Monday as it blows past just west of Tampa, Fla., where tens of thousands of convention-goers and media representatives are gathering.

The proceedings will resume on Tuesday at 2 p.m. with Republicans taking their roll call vote in early evening to formally nominate Mr. Romney and his running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan (R) of Wisconsin, to the Republican ticket. The conventions new schedule appears to have cut only one previously named speaker: Steve Cohen of Screen Machine, a portable crushing and screening equipment manufacturer.

However, convention planners offered a list of 15 GOP House members and House candidates plus three Senate candidates who could get less time at the podium in order to make way for those whom Mr. …

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Republicans Retool Convention to Avoid Isaac: Who's in, Who's Out?
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