Barack Obama: Ending Welfare Reform as We Know It; Politics; President Would Allow States to Waive the Work Requirement for People on Welfare; WELFARE-TO-WORK - OTHER VIEWS

By Talent, Jim | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 28, 2012 | Go to article overview

Barack Obama: Ending Welfare Reform as We Know It; Politics; President Would Allow States to Waive the Work Requirement for People on Welfare; WELFARE-TO-WORK - OTHER VIEWS


Talent, Jim, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


When I went to Congress in 1993, the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program then in place - although certainly well- intentioned - had become a stumbling block for lower-income Americans, because it allowed people to collect welfare indefinitely but only if they met three conditions: They had to (1.) raise small children, (2.) without being married, and (3.) without ever getting a job.

It was obvious to me that the welfare system was abusing the very people it was supposed to help. Historically, the two best antipoverty programs are work and marriage, and our welfare system conditioned assistance to impoverished people on them doing neither.

I have two teenage daughters. Raising them (and my son) was a humbling experience for my wife and me. Parenting taught me that life is complicated. But this much I know: If my daughters were struggling, the one thing I would not do is tell them I would support them indefinitely - but only as long as they continued bearing children without having either a husband or a job.

That's the reason then-Congressman Tim Hutchinson and I introduced the Real Welfare Reform Act of 1994. It was the blueprint for the work requirements enacted on a bipartisan basis in the historic 1996 welfare reform law.

Our legislation gave the states discretion in how they operated the welfare system, subject to one requirement: They had to get people working. The bill was not onerous. It only required that 50 percent of able-bodied people on welfare do some kind of real work or worker training. Because the bill only applied to half the welfare caseload, no waivers were permitted.

Congressman Hutchinson and I - and all the sponsors of welfare reform - made the deliberate decision not to allow the Department of Health and Human Services to grant waivers from the work requirements in the bill. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Barack Obama: Ending Welfare Reform as We Know It; Politics; President Would Allow States to Waive the Work Requirement for People on Welfare; WELFARE-TO-WORK - OTHER VIEWS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.