Keep the Bible out of Politics

By Fuller, Frederick | The Roanoke Times (Roanoke, VA), September 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

Keep the Bible out of Politics


Fuller, Frederick, The Roanoke Times (Roanoke, VA)


"It says so in the Bible. Don't question it." Even as a child, that statement, usually from my mother, made me angry. What makes that book the inerrant authority over me, I grumbled to myself.

The Bible is not the word of God; it is a compilation of myriad scores of human beings' encounters with what they believed was God's word. Since the words come from human beings, they cannot all be inerrant.

However, through the ages Christians have used the Bible as the only guide by which to regard what people should believe. Christians are experts at spinning biblical text to mean what they want it to mean.

Example: Aug.26, we celebrated adoption of the 19thAmendment to the U.S. Constitution guaranteeing American women the right to vote. Indeed, opponents of the Amendment used ITimothy from the New Testament to show it was against God's will:

A wife should learn quietly with complete submission. I don't allow a wife to teach or to control her husband. Instead, she should be a quiet listener. Adam was formed first, and then Eve. Adam wasn't deceived, but rather his wife ? was completely deceived. ?

That was Paul's opinion, not the word of God. If one argues Paul was instructed by God to write that, I argue, then, Paul was a religious hysteric who disrespected women, a universal opinion held by men at that time.

God's blessing of slavery was also supported by twists and turns of opinions espoused by so-called apostles of God.

And now we see this unholy book being used to injure a segment of humanity that is asking two things: Let us love unconditionally and let us participate fully in the American culture. Gay and lesbian Americans are asking and the Bible is being used by religious hysterics among us to stop them from enjoying life as human beings. …

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