Making Art Creation His Craft

By LaRue, Jennifer | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), November 22, 2012 | Go to article overview

Making Art Creation His Craft


LaRue, Jennifer, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


In a garage in Medical Lake, machinery and tools have taken over. There is a planer - a woodworking machine for making boards of equal thickness - table and miter saws, a router table, a dust collector, various hand tools, and many types of wood.

This is where woodworker Jim Everman satisfies his need to make things. A fan of the Arts and Crafts movement, Everman builds clocks, furniture, mantles, and cigar box guitars.

It began when Everman was in the Air Force, stationed in South Dakota in 1972. His wife, Bev, wanted to frame some pictures so he made frames. "After that, I just started making things that we needed and wanted," he said.

Walking around his home, he points to things he made - a grandfather-type clock that doubles as a display shelf, a room divider and a rack holding quilts made by Bev's mother and grandmothers. His works are heirloom pieces, meant to be handed down the generations and, unlike factory-made items, they contain a piece of the heart of the artist himself.

"What I really like is when I know that a piece I have made is appreciated and used in someone else's house," he said, "It makes me feel good to know that."

What Everman does is simply make stuff. "I've made soap and candles. I've tanned hides," he said."I made a lamp out of an old teapot I found in the Black Hills and stretched a hide over a punch bowl to make a drum. Really, I just do stuff and make things."

Recently, he found an old tin film container at an antique store thatcould be made into either a banjo or a dulcimer guitar, he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Making Art Creation His Craft
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.