Oklahoma Universities Conducive to Education of Veterans

By Tuttle, D Ray | THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Oklahoma Universities Conducive to Education of Veterans


Tuttle, D Ray, THE JOURNAL RECORD


U.S. military involvement has ended in Iraq and is ratcheting down in Afghanistan. Now, as veterans return to the United States, they are ready to continue their education.

Colleges and universities in Oklahoma are participating in the Yellow Ribbon program, which allows veterans from across the country to attend schools here at a tuition rate lower than that for traditional out-of-state students.

In many cases, veterans attend these schools at no charge.

Oklahoma has reciprocity agreements with some states allowing veterans to attend its institutions for the same tuition they would pay in their home states, but the Yellow Ribbon program can provide for veterans not covered by those agreements.

Yellow Ribbon makes attending college affordable for veterans through the Post-9/11 GI Bill's Chapter 33 educational benefits, which can apply to up to four years of enrollment as much as 15 years after discharge, said Jennifer Trimmer, veterans student services coordinator for the University of Oklahoma in Norman.

Policies are in place at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater to enroll these nontraditional students and support them through graduation, said Paula Barnes, assistant registrar at OSU.

"Veteran students and their dependents receive the same services as all our nontraditional students," Barnes said. "The veterans benefit services office is dedicated to accurate and timely processing of Department of Veterans Affairs' education benefit paperwork to assist these students in meeting the financial obligations of university attendance."

Veterans are a special group of people, said Paula Page, associate registrar and veteran's coordinator at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah.

"These men and women of the military, as well as their dependents, bring many positive assets and insights with them," Page said. "They are an outstanding inclusion which benefits our other students and our faculty and staff as well."

'They study hard'

Geoffrey Allen of Tulsa is a political science major at the University of Tulsa working on a bachelor of arts degree with a minor in philosophy. Allen, a 1987 graduate of Nathan Hale High School in Tulsa, served in the U.S. Army in the first Iraq war 22 years ago - what was then called Desert Storm and Desert Shield. He left the Army at the rank of Specialist D-4.

Allen is enrolled in a program called "Troops to Teachers" at TU.

It is been invaluable, Allen said. He worked in the private sector after exiting the military, but was laid off about 18 months ago. That was when he decided to return to school for a second career.

"It takes vets with technical skills or a college degree and puts them in a classroom," Allen said. "I've always had a strong sense of giving back and this allows me to do that. It is a great honor being able to attend TU with taxpayer assistance."

Allen will walk across the stage in May for his degree. He wants to be teaching in a high school or middle school this fall.

Allen is one of 86 veterans attending TU through the various programs, said Cindy Watts, TU associate registrar.

"The number of veterans at TU has gone up 72 percent since the new GI Bill was passed," Watts said. "Prior to that, there maybe were 50."

The types of degrees the veterans pursue are across the board, she said, including law, computer science and the university's Cyber Corps, Watts said. The Cyber Corps is a program that trains computer experts to be the first line of defense against cyber-attacks on information systems across the U.S. Most Cyber Corps graduates find jobs within the federal government, many in the National Security Agency, CIA or Department of Defense.

A key difference between vets and the traditional students is maturity and sense of purpose, said Roger N. Blais, TU provost and vice president for academic affairs.

"They know what they want to do; they are focused," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Oklahoma Universities Conducive to Education of Veterans
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.