Obama's Labor Board Bails out Big Unions Again

By Examiner , The Washington Examiner | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, December 28, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama's Labor Board Bails out Big Unions Again


Examiner , The Washington Examiner, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


This was not a good year for organized labor. Despite expending massive resources, Big Labor could not oust Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker in a recall; Michigan, home of the United Auto Workers, became a right-to-work state; the Supreme Court ruled against unionists in the landmark case Knox v. SEIU, limiting their ability to extract dues from nonmembers; and union numbers continued to dwindle, falling to just 6.9 percent of the private sector.

But Big Labor may have won the battle that matters the most: the presidential election. In the last month, the White House has since been busy rewriting regulations in a way that favors unions at every turn.

Unions just don't have the power to force their own agenda through anymore. But the next-best thing to having power is having friends with power, and they have a friend in President Obama.

For example, the Labor Department will introduce a new rule next year requiring employers to divulge all information on labor consultants they hire. This will drive many of these consultants -- mostly small law firms -- out of the business completely.

Meanwhile, the National Labor Relations Board -- which is nominally independent but whose majority has been appointed by President Obama -- is working on a new rule requiring employers to turn over all employee contact information to unions during their organizing drives, something that will greatly help them identify prospective members. The workers themselves will have no say in this.

Just last week, the NLRB released a number of decisions that further rewrote the rules in Big Labor's favor. …

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Obama's Labor Board Bails out Big Unions Again
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