Dynamic Passives and the 'Exonerative Past'

By Walker, Ruth | The Christian Science Monitor, January 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Dynamic Passives and the 'Exonerative Past'


Walker, Ruth, The Christian Science Monitor


There's always more to know about verbs. Or, I should say: "We can always learn more about verbs."

As I continue dipping into Constance Hale's new book on the power of verbs, "Vex, Hex, Smash, Smooch," touched on here last week, I'm reminded that "there is" can be a wimpy way to start a sentence.

So can the use of the passive voice, and Ms. Hale rightly inveighs against its overuse. But before she gets too deep into the weeds of "voice," in a grammatical sense, she introduces other important distinctions.

The metaphor she chooses is bread. The first distinction she draws is between dynamic and static verbs. Dynamic verbs action verbs are of the crunchy, hearty, whole-grain variety. Static verbs to be in all its forms; other linking verbs (appear, become, seem); and auxiliary and causative verbs ("Don't make me yell") are the white bread. White bread can be pretty bland, even a lovely baguette. But a baguette makes a great support medium for raspberry jam. And so even bland white-bread verbs have their purpose: to hold delicious nouns, adjectives, and adverbs in interesting sentences.

Good writing balances these two broad types of verbs, and doesn't hesitate to use the passive voice when it's called for as when it's important to keep the focus on the subject of the sentence, even when it's not the doer of the action: "Long-sought murder suspect finally arrested."

The passive voice that right-thinking people everywhere love to hate is the I'm-apologizing-but-not-really language that is too often part of political discourse.

"Serious mistakes were made," Ronald Reagan acknowledged in his 1987 State of the Union message, referring to missteps during the Iran-contra affair. …

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