Washington Popular in Advertising since 19th Century

By Kovel, Terry | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 17, 2013 | Go to article overview

Washington Popular in Advertising since 19th Century


Kovel, Terry, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


It would not be in good taste or even legal to use a picture of the president of the United States as part of a product's package design or advertisement. Most states have laws that prohibit the unapproved use of a person's name or likeness for "commercial benefit."

This was not a concern when George Washington (1732-1799) was president (1789-1797). He was admired by the public, but there were no photographs of him and few portraits. Product packaging back then was usually a plain black and white folded paper packet.

In the 19th century, celebrations of Washington's Feb. 22 birthday and the July 4 birthday of the United States made Washington a symbol of the country.

A surprising number of things collected today feature Washington's portrait. At least three tobacco companies used "Washington" as a brand name -- one for pipe tobacco, one for plug tobacco and one for chewing tobacco. Each had a picture of Washington on the package, often beside a flag and other patriotic symbols.

Collectors of Washington memorabilia can find a brand of coffee, a soup company's ads, dishes, calendars and many other products that feature Washington's image. No doubt he would be upset to know he once advertised Acapulco Gold cigarette papers. Other Washington collectibles found today include old posters and signs advertising products such as insurance, 1876 Centennial furniture with wooden inlay picturing Washington, and paper needle cases from 1930s dime stores.

Even today, Washington is a spokesman for products. In the past year, he has promoted cars, beer, an appliance store and a state lottery.

A colorful 3 inch-by-4 inch tobacco tin for Washington Mixture tobacco, picturing Washington and a flag, auctioned for $303 at a 2012 William Morford auction in upstate New York. Almost all George Washington-related collectibles and antiques are selling well.

KDKA led the way with 1920 election

Q: My mother said she and my father had the first radio in our area, and people came from all over to listen to it. She thought it was about 1919 or 1920. My dad built the radio, then bought a cabinet to put it in. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Washington Popular in Advertising since 19th Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.