GOP Can Be Part of Climate Change Solution; Climate Protection Act; Republicans Would Support a Market-Based Solution

By Reynolds, Mark | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 27, 2013 | Go to article overview

GOP Can Be Part of Climate Change Solution; Climate Protection Act; Republicans Would Support a Market-Based Solution


Reynolds, Mark, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


A carbon tax bill that gives revenue back to households? Now were getting somewhere.

Thats what Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) placed on the table when she and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) announced plans to introduce carbon-fee-and-dividend legislation. Their proposal places a fee on coal, oil and natural gas at the first point of sale and then rebates a substantial part of the revenue to the public as monthly dividends, either by check or electronically.

At a press conference to introduce the Climate Protection Act, Boxer said her aim was to get legislation to the floor of the Senate by summer.

What could possibly be better?

How about Republican support?

Without backing from some GOP lawmakers, the bill stands little chance of passage in the Senate, much less the Republican- controlled House. Unless it is bipartisan, any climate legislation no matter its intention amounts to little more than a gesture.

Given President Obamas ultimatum to Congress to cut carbon or I will, the GOP has great incentive to support a market-based solution to the climate crisis. The alternative is expansion of Environmental Protection Agency regulations on greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. Efforts to block those regulations will prove to be a waste of time and energy, as the U.S. Supreme Court has already ruled that the EPA has the authority to regulate carbon dioxide and other pollutants that warm the Earth.

Time and time again, conservatives extol the power of the free market rather than government to make good things happen in our society. Its time, then, for Republicans to walk the talk and embrace a tax on carbon that returns revenue to the public.

Greg Mankiw, economic adviser to President George W. Bush and presidential candidate Mitt Romney, explains the conservative rationale for a carbon tax: Economists have long understood that the key to smart environmental policy is aligning private incentives with true social costs and benefits. That means putting a price on carbon emissions, so households and firms will have good reason to reduce their use of fossil fuels and to develop alternative energy sources.

While Obama wields the hammer that may move Republicans toward legislative action, the Boxer-Sanders bill, in its current form, stands little chance of attracting support from across the aisle. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

GOP Can Be Part of Climate Change Solution; Climate Protection Act; Republicans Would Support a Market-Based Solution
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.