Leading, Lighting & Lunching

By Wallace, Alan | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Leading, Lighting & Lunching


Wallace, Alan, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Check out these titles for interesting reads about military, political and grassroots leadership, a past technological upheaval on par with today's, and the implications of what most Americans eat most of the time.

"Damn Few: Making the Modern SEAL Warrior" by Rorke Denver and Ellis Henican (Hyperion) -- Lt. Cmdr. Rorke Denver, who played himself in the 2012 movie "Act of Valor" and recently left active duty for the reserves, spent 14 years as a Navy SEALs officer, carrying out missions in Latin America, Liberia, Iraq and Afghanistan and earning the Bronze Star with "V" for valor before a four-year stint overseeing all aspects of SEAL training as executive officer of the Navy Special Warfare Center's Advanced Training Command. Rorke says a book launched his own SEAL dream and his book, written with assistance from a Newsday columnist and Fox News commentator, aims to teach "lessons that go far beyond the battlefield, inspiring a fresh generation of warriors to carry on that dream," according to the publisher.

"Why Coolidge Matters: Leadership Lessons from America's Most Underrated President" by Charles C. Johnson (Encounter Books, available March 12) -- Slated to arrive a month after Amity Shlaes' biography "Coolidge" appeared, this book should reinforce the emerging trend of renewed interest in "Silent Cal" and his less-is- more governing style, which resonates in our big-government age. Its author, whose work has been published in a number of periodicals oriented toward free markets and individual liberty, says America now has much in common with America in the 1920s -- controversy over public-employee unions, aimless foreign policy, southern-border worries, racial and ethnic groups' political influence, violent crime driven by illicit traffic in banned substances. Examining how Coolidge dealt with such issues, he finds valuable lessons for today's advocates of limited government.

"Rules for Conservative Radicals: How the Tea Party Movement Can Save America" by Dr. David L. Goetsch and Dr. Archie P. Jones (White Hall Press) -- Available free in e-book form as a 94-page PDF download from patriotdepot.com and teapartyeconomist.com, this book's title slyly alludes to both Saul Alinsky's "Rules for Radicals" and its authors' belief that things have reversed since the 1960s, making today's "radicals" conservatives who favor "limited government, low taxation, free-market economics, individual liberty, personal responsibility, military strength, constitutional sovereignty, and traditional American values," as co-author Goetsch put it last October in one of his patriotupdate.

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