A Call for More Cooperative Mississippi River Management; Big River Initiative; the River System Is an Interconnected One, and It Must Be Managed That Way

By Milling, R King | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), December 4, 2012 | Go to article overview

A Call for More Cooperative Mississippi River Management; Big River Initiative; the River System Is an Interconnected One, and It Must Be Managed That Way


Milling, R King, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Disasters remind us of what we value most yet often take for granted. They tend to expose our failures as a society to face reality and do what is necessary to safeguard our vital assets. Recent Hurricanes Sandy and Isaac, for instance, served as tragic reminders that our coastal cities are more vulnerable than ever to increasingly powerful storms, sea level rise and coastal erosion.

The year also brought one of the worst droughts in 50 years to the Heartland, where it has decimated crops and continues to haunt the nations farmers and others who rely on the Mississippi River to transport their goods.

By early next month, a shallower Mississippi may impair navigation between St. Louis and Cairo, Ill. This comes at the end of harvest in the Midwest, and it is estimated that if the river shuts down, more than $2 billion in agricultural commodities, such as corn and wheat, will be at risk. Lets be clear; this is not the only segment of the American economy that will suffer.

The river is the lifeblood of both the Midwest and the Gulf South, and its global connections to agriculture, manufacturing, energy and other sectors make it the nations main artery of commerce.

Every day an armada of barges travels the Big River many are at least 300 feet long and haul more than 2,500 tons of grain, petroleum, coal, iron, steel or rock, providing a highly efficient means of transportation and a gateway to global markets through Gulf Coast ports.

In addition to navigation, demands on the river to provide worthwhile services for sometimes competing interests place a heavy burden on its health and sustainability. Commerce and the environment, recreation and transportation, water quality and water supply the Mississippi is expected to service all demands. Over time, this has led to a series of degrading forces and unintended consequences that have stressed the river and its tributaries, threatening the enormous environmental and economic benefits it provides nationwide.

For instance, the same river that transports this countrys agricultural bounty to the world also carries runoff from farm fields and urban areas, such as nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer and animal waste. Throughout the Mississippi watershed, these nutrients eventually arrive in the rivers main stem and flow to the Gulf of Mexico, creating large blooms of algae that essentially choke the Gulf of oxygen. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Call for More Cooperative Mississippi River Management; Big River Initiative; the River System Is an Interconnected One, and It Must Be Managed That Way
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.