Lead Us, Mr. President, the Time Is Now; Our View; Preventing Mass Shootings Must Become an American Obsession

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), December 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

Lead Us, Mr. President, the Time Is Now; Our View; Preventing Mass Shootings Must Become an American Obsession


President Barack Obama spoke from the heart, as a father, in mourning another senseless school shooting on Friday.

Wiping tears from his eyes and quoting from Psalm 147 He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds. Mr. Obama showed as much emotion as hes ever displayed as president.

Now its time for him to show resolve.

After perhaps the most-heartbreaking school shooting in U.S. history, America needs a president.

For too long in our nations history, our politicians have shrunk from dealing with truly difficult problems.

Trying to stop innocent children from being slaughtered shouldnt be one of them.

The president hinted that a political discussion about such tragedies might be forthcoming when he said: And were going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics.

Lead us in that conversation, Mr. President.

Not as a father. Not as a candidate.

But as the leader of the free world.

For a country as powerful as the United States is, it has utterly failed in the department of stopping mass shootings. Of the worst 20 mass shootings in the last 50 years, worldwide, 11 of them have taken place in the U.S.

Our country is violent. Were angry. We love our guns and can get them easily.

Something must be done to reduce the carnage.

Lets be clear: As we write this, the details in the Connecticut shooting arent all in. But this much is obvious: Like Aurora, like Columbine, like Virginia Tech and Fort Hood, like Kirkwood in 2007, a man with ill intentions had easy access to guns and ammunition and used that access to murder over and over again. …

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