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Under Fire, Microsoft Revises Office 2013 Licensing Policy

By Shaer, Matthew | The Christian Science Monitor, March 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

Under Fire, Microsoft Revises Office 2013 Licensing Policy


Shaer, Matthew, The Christian Science Monitor


Earlier this year, Microsoft launched Office 365, an updated version of its venerable software package. The release was pretty well-received. But it came with one very big catch: Consumers could only install the software on one machine (unless you purchased the expensive Home Premium or University versions of Office 365, which did allow five and two transfers, respectively).

The only exception was if your computer crashed under warranty, in which case, presumably, you would have to show that warranty to Microsoft in order get the free transfer. Unsurprisingly, this policy did not make consumers very happy, and frustrated comments quickly piled up on the Office blog.

"The licensing changes are ridiculous and anti-customer friendly," one user wrote. "In [whose] mind does it make sense to permanently attach a license to a computer, instead of to a user?"

Microsoft weathered the criticism for a few weeks, and then today, it announced it would revise the transfer policy for Office.

"Based on customer feedback we have changed the Office 2013 retail license agreement to allow customers to transfer the software from one computer to another," Microsoft's Jevon Fark wrote in a blog post. "This means customers can transfer Office 2013 to a different computer if their device fails or they get a new one.

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Under Fire, Microsoft Revises Office 2013 Licensing Policy
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