Be Careful What, How You Write

By BruzzeseGannett, Anita | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 9, 2013 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Be Careful What, How You Write


BruzzeseGannett, Anita, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Think about one of the dozens of emails you sent in the last week at work.

Did any of them have typos? Spelling errors?

Was each of them concise and clear? Did they convey that you're a capable professional?

Sending emails every day has become as routine to most workers as brushing their teeth. But that casualness can mean that we send poorly written messages that are riddled with errors, say Brenda Greene and Helen Cunningham, authors of "The Business Style Handbook."

With the explosion of texts, instant messages, social media posts and blogs, Greene and Cunningham say that the writing rules first outlined in their book 10 years ago are more important now than ever. They recently updated their book and reconnected with many of the Fortune 500 employers they interviewed years ago to find that no matter the profession, employees are writing more.

"I think probably the standards for writing have gotten higher. You have writing that is available online in real time, and it really raises the bar. It puts more pressure on people," Cunningham says.

The problem with the pressure to write faster and more often is that workers can fall into bad habits that can have bottom-line consequences, they say. Failing to verify your facts in an email could cost your company money or jeopardize a deal.

The stakes also can be high for your career. If you send an email or write a report that has grammatical errors or isn't clearly written, bosses might believe that you're not a good representative of the company or not ready for a promotion, they say.

"Credibility is so essential," Greene says.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Be Careful What, How You Write
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?