Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Receives $7.8 Million Grant for Junior Researchers

By Record, Journal | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 12, 2013 | Go to article overview
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Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Receives $7.8 Million Grant for Junior Researchers


Record, Journal, THE JOURNAL RECORD


A new $7.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will help five Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists jump- start new projects over the next five years, support institutional core facilities and pay for renovations to an animal facility.

The funding will allow scientists to create an Institutional Development Award, or IDeA, Center of Biomedical Research Excellence at OMRF. The IDeA program builds research capacities in states that historically have had low levels of NIH funding by supporting basic, clinical and translational research, faculty development, and infrastructure improvements.

Linda Thompson, OMRF researcher, heads the project, which aims to give junior investigators startup funds for innovative research and to support core facilities that are important for the institution as a whole.

"This is an important grant for a couple of reasons," said Thompson, who holds the Putnam City Schools Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research. "Federal research dollars are harder and harder to come by, which means scientists who are just starting out have a difficult time getting funding for new and cutting-edge ideas.

"A COBRE (Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence) grant like this is also a stamp of approval in some ways," she said. "It says that OMRF has gathered an impressive group of up-and-coming researchers and that their projects could prove instrumental in improving human health," she said.

Other OMRF researchers are involved in the grant.

Hui-Ying Lim is investigating the essential role of free radical signaling in proper heart development and function using fruit flies.

Lorin Olson wants to understand how a signaling by the protein PDFG (platelet derived growth factor) plays a role in the body's healing process and a kind of scarring called fibrosis.

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Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Receives $7.8 Million Grant for Junior Researchers
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