Clements, Thomas "Tom" Lynn Continued: The Position Involved Significant Interaction with the Judiciary across the State as Well as Other Divisions within State Government. Tom Was Promoted in 1999 to Deputy Director of the Division of Adult Institutio

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), March 24, 2013 | Go to article overview

Clements, Thomas "Tom" Lynn Continued: The Position Involved Significant Interaction with the Judiciary across the State as Well as Other Divisions within State Government. Tom Was Promoted in 1999 to Deputy Director of the Division of Adult Institutio


Clements, Thomas "Tom" Lynn continued: The position involved significant interaction with the judiciary across the state as well as other divisions within state government. Tom was promoted in 1999 to Deputy Director of the Division of Adult Institutions. He had direct operational oversight for seven of Missouri's adult correctional institutions, which housed more than 10,000 inmates and were operated by nearly 3,000 staff. The institutions ranged from low security to maximum security. Tom planned and opened a 2,000 bed Western Reception Diagnostic and Correctional Center and provided direct supervision of prison superintendents. His job included significant leadership and strategic planning in the development of new programs, offender population growth management and operational initiatives within the Department of Corrections. Tom was the founding chairperson for Missouri's Transition from Prison to Community inter-departmental Steering Team and an active member of the Missouri Re-entry Process Steering Team. Tom became Director of the Division of Adult Institutions in 2007 and expanded his oversight to 21 adult correctional institutions and management of more than 30,000 incarcerated offenders. He served at the appointing authority for more than 8,000 divisional employees and resolved labor and management issues that arose with employee labor organizations. Tom retired from the Missouri Department of Corrections in 2011 and moved to Colorado after he was appointed by Gov. John Hickenlooper to work as the Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Corrections. As the Executive Director he was responsible to ensure the safe, secure and humane operations of state and private institutions and parole operations. This included ensuring offenders had the opportunity to participate in educational programs, treatment and other services designed to effectively instill pro-social behaviors and promote successful outcomes.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clements, Thomas "Tom" Lynn Continued: The Position Involved Significant Interaction with the Judiciary across the State as Well as Other Divisions within State Government. Tom Was Promoted in 1999 to Deputy Director of the Division of Adult Institutio
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.