Salmonella Confirmedin Peanut Butter Plant. the Food and Drug Administration ...[Derived Headline]

Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Salmonella Confirmedin Peanut Butter Plant. the Food and Drug Administration ...[Derived Headline]


Salmonella confirmedin peanut butter plant

The Food and Drug Administration says it has found salmonella in a New Mexico plant that produces nut butters for national retailer Trader Joe's and other grocery chains. The Trader Joe's peanut butter is now linked to 35 salmonella illnesses in 19 states. The FDA said on Friday that Washington state health officials have also confirmed the presence of salmonella in a jar of the Trader Joe's peanut butter found in a victim's home. Sunland Inc. has expanded its recall to include all products manufactured in the plant in the last 21/2 years, since March 2010. Whole Foods Market, Target, Safeway and many other national chains have used Sunland products in their own brands. Almost two-thirds of those sickened are children younger than 10.

Areva's bid to build reactors nixed

Czech state-run power utility CEZ says it has rejected a bid by France's state-owned nuclear engineering giant Areva SA to build two more nuclear reactors at the Temelin nuclear plant. CEZ says Areva's bid has not met necessary criteria to run for the contract, estimated to be worth more than $10 billion. CEZ said in a statement on Friday that Areva may appeal. Cranberry-based Westinghouse Electric Co., a subsidiary of Japan's Toshiba Corp. and a consortium led by Russia's Atomstroyexport are the remaining bidders. The deal is to be signed by the end of 2013. The two reactors would be operational by 2025, bringing the number of Temelin's reactors to four.

Consumer credit up $18.1B in Aug.

Americans boosted their borrowing in August by the largest amount in three months with strong gains in the category that covers auto and student loans and in credit card debt. Total consumer borrowing increased $18.1 billion in August compared with July, the Federal Reserve reported on Friday. In July, consumer borrowing had fallen for the first time in nearly a year. The rebound in August, along with a separate report that showed the nation's unemployment rate dropped to 7.8 percent in September, are viewed as encouraging signs for an economy that has been struggling in recent months.

American: Seats on 42 planes fixed

American Airlines says it has repaired 42 of 48 planes that were pulled aside and inspected because the seats could come loose. The airline said around midday Friday that all seat repairs on its Boeing 757 airplanes should be done by Saturday. American canceled 44 flights on Friday after it scrapped 50 flights on Thursday because of the seat problem. Crews inspected the planes earlier in the week and thought they had fixed them. …

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