Google Takes Easter Heat over Cesar Chavez Doodle

By Knickerbocker, Brad | The Christian Science Monitor, March 31, 2013 | Go to article overview

Google Takes Easter Heat over Cesar Chavez Doodle


Knickerbocker, Brad, The Christian Science Monitor


Google is taking heat for its Easter Sunday doodle that cartoon modification of its logo that changes from day to day.

Today, the middle letter is a round portrait of the late migrant farm labor union leader Cesar Chavez.

Like many such doodles, it comes on the birthday of the subject. Mr. Chavez was born March 31, 1927 in Yuma, Arizona.

But appearing on Easter one of the holiest days for hundreds of millions of Christians around the world the Chavez Google doodle has set off a mini-storm of protest, including (inevitably) in the twitterverse.

Some examples:

Unbelievable! Their true colors are showing! Yahoo here I come!

Damn Google. No Easter wishes from those Atheists.

A huge BOOO!! to Google for making their holiday doodle about Cesar Chavez's 86th birthday instead of Easter (celebrated by over a billion).

I've got nothing against Cesar Chavez, but even Chavez was a Catholic. I doubt he'd want Google to recognize him on Resurrection Day.

Better a dead lefty, them a risen Lord.

Google uses Caesar Chavez on Easter instead of using something Easter related? Okay, I'm switching to Bing.

Apparently confusing Cesar Chavez with Hugo Chavez, the late president of Venezuela, one wrote: Google can't celebrate Easter but can celebrate a dictator's birthday?!

But theres been more thoughtful comment as well, unlimited by the snappy 140-character Twitter format much of it alluding to Chavezs own Christian religion

Googles odd choice should remind us that whatever one thinks of Chavezs politics, they are impossible to understand apart from his belief in the resurrected Christ, writes Matthew Schmitz, deputy editor of First Things, an ecumenical journal published by The Institute on Religion and Public Life.

As a Christian, Chavez believed that the first revolution had to be a revolution of the soul, which meant that personal sacrifices were demanded not just of the oppressor, but of the oppressed, writes Mr. …

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