Researchers Identify New Gene Tied to Alzheimer's in African- Americans

By Chang, Daniel | Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque), April 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Researchers Identify New Gene Tied to Alzheimer's in African- Americans


Chang, Daniel, Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque)


University of Miami medical school researchers working with geneticists and physicians from other institutions have identified a new gene associated with Alzheimer's disease in African-Americans, a finding that doctors say could help them prescribe more effective therapies and drugs for patients affected by the disease.

The collaborative study that led researchers from UM and other universities to identify the gene, called ABCA7, will be published Thursday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Dr. Margaret A. Pericak-Vance, director of UM's John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics and one of the senior authors of the study, said the discovery of ABCA7 will allow researchers to develop therapies and drugs more specifically suited to African-American patients affected by Alzheimer's, a disease for which there is no prevention or cure.

While Alzheimer's occurs as frequently in African-Americans as other populations, Pericak-Vance said there are important differences in the molecular mechanisms of the disease among people of different races and ethnicities.

Identifying these differences, she said, may help researchers develop treatments and drugs that are more likely to be effective because they're tailor-made for an individual's genetic makeup.

For instance, the ABCA7 gene, which is found in people of all races, is a greater risk factor for Alzheimer's among African- Americans than it is among non-Hispanic whites, according to the study.

"There are going to be a lot of things that are similar across different races, different ethnicities," she said. "But there's also going to be some population differences. When it comes to the point where we can translate these discoveries into therapies and prevention, we will need to understand all these nuances in order to find the right drug or the right therapy for that individual person."

Until this study, most clinical research into the genetics of Alzheimer's involved patients of European descent, said Dr. Pascal Goldschmidt, dean of UM's Miller School of Medicine.

The research project that led to the discovery of the new gene is believed to be the largest genome-wide association study conducted on late-onset Alzheimer's disease in African-Americans. It included 1,968 cases and 3,928 controls collected at multiple sites between 1989 and 2011.

Goldschmidt said 21st century medicine is heading in the direction of personalized health care, and doctors will need to understand the genetic differences among patients in order to maximize their care.

"We will be able to bring support to our patients that is what we call culturalized," he said, "which means that it's not only based on science but also based on what culture you come from, where is your ancestry from, what kind of gene pool you have been provided with. …

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