Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Discovery Could Lead to Lupus Cure

By Terry-Cobo, Sarah | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Discovery Could Lead to Lupus Cure


Terry-Cobo, Sarah, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Teresa Thompson loves square dancing, even though she has to wear a sign that says, "Please don't touch me." She dances with her husband, but sometimes she hurts so much that even he can only touch her hand and elbow.

In 1991, Thompson was diagnosed with lupus. Every day for the last 20 years she's had a headache; she also suffers from memory loss and arthritis. Last week, she was diagnosed with a rare but manageable form of cancer. Thompson hasn't had a steady job in years because when symptoms from the autoimmune disease flare up, she can't sit, stand or lay down for more than a few minutes at a time.

"Your brain becomes used to the pain, and you try your best to not to let it define who you are," Thompson said. "Everybody gets diseases of some sort; mine just has more challenges than most."

She hopes there will one day be a treatment that will help manage her symptoms. A personalized treatment could help the other eight members of her family who also have the disease. But for one sibling, a cure didn't come quick enough; her sister died a few years ago.

Dr. Patrick Gaffney is working to find a cure that would help Thompson. A medical doctor at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Gaffney is part of a group of research scientists that has discovered a gene associated with Lupus. Now they are working to understand how a change in one's DNA sequence is responsible for altering the genes that cause the disease.

Thanks to a $750,000 machine at OMRF, Gaffney and his colleagues can sequence a genome in 36 hours. Gaffney said that in a few years, if he and other scientists can identify people with a group of mutated genes associated with lupus, they will be able to understand which medicine is best for the patient.

But his research is expensive. A single genome sequencing test costs $5,000, so his team could easily spend $50,000 in two weeks. Most grants are about $500,000, but he can't spend all that money on the science. Some of it must be spent to keep the lights on and to pay research assistants and technicians. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Discovery Could Lead to Lupus Cure
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.