Supreme Court Ruling on Affirmative Action Shows Diversity Still Matters

By Op-ed, Andrew Blotky | The Christian Science Monitor, June 24, 2013 | Go to article overview

Supreme Court Ruling on Affirmative Action Shows Diversity Still Matters


Op-ed, Andrew Blotky, The Christian Science Monitor


Today's 7-1 Supreme Court decision on diversity in the University of Texas admissions program reaffirms the crucial role that diversity plays in the strength of America - even while requiring the university to again jump through hoops to prove the validity of its admissions program.

All students - no matter where they live, or what their race or social status - benefit from a diverse educational environment where they learn from the life experiences of their classmates, and can carry these experiences with them through their lives.

Retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor recognized this 10 years ago, when she wrote that "classroom discussion is livelier, more spirited, and simply more enlightening and interesting" when students have "the greatest possible variant of backgrounds."

And today the court renewed that principle, even while it sent the case - Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin - back to a lower court to apply a stricter standard on the university to show that "no workable race-neutral alternatives would produce the educational benefits of diversity," as Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the lead opinion.

The lower federal court had earlier ruled in favor of the university, and against Abigail Fisher, who claimed in 2008 that the only reason she was denied admission to UT at Austin was because she is white, even though she would not have met the university's other admissions requirements.

In a country that has great diversity, many of the nation's most prominent and important institutions still lag far behind. And let there be no doubt, there are some justices, perhaps even a majority, on the court today who would do away with Justice O'Connor's principle. They may believe that as a nation, the United States has achieved the promise of true quality, but most Americans know otherwise.

Whites are nearly twice as likely to enroll in college as blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans. And according to recent Census estimates, nearly 65 percent of black adults and 80 percent of Latino adults fail to complete some form of post-secondary education, compared to 50 percent of the white population.

Diverse viewpoints and experiences challenge our beliefs and push us to open our minds to new ideas, new ways, and create a sense of understanding that's fundamental to success in a modern, wired, global economy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Supreme Court Ruling on Affirmative Action Shows Diversity Still Matters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.