Eliot Spitzer's Comeback Is More Scary Than Tawdry

By Klein, Philip | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, July 18, 2013 | Go to article overview

Eliot Spitzer's Comeback Is More Scary Than Tawdry


Klein, Philip, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Eliot Spitzer is lucky that newspapers exposed his yen for high- priced Washington hookers.

The sex scandal that ended Spitzer's governorship in 2008 distracted attention from his even more egregious abuses of power. Because his downfall was associated with personal foibles, he now has an opening to regain power, which he will no doubt abuse again.

In 1994, Spitzer launched his political career by cheating and then lying about it. A lawyer and prosecutor without a very public profile, Spitzer had no political experience when he decided to run for New York state attorney general.

But he did have a very rich father. Over the course of two campaigns for AG (the unsuccessful 1994 race and the 1998 victory), Spitzer manipulated campaign finance law and effectively received millions in campaign donations from his real estate mogul father, according to the New York Times, even while publicly denying it.

Once sworn in as AG, Spitzer was able to raise his profile by publicly shaming unpopular targets. When a wave of scandals rocked Wall Street in 2001 through 2003, Spitzer seized the opportunity. His strategy was to attack behavior that seemed improper (even if it wasn't necessarily illegal) and keep leaking embarrassing information to the media until his targets agreed to settle rather than endure more negative publicity.

When Spitzer's targets were willing to stand up to the public shaming campaign and fight him in court, Spitzer's record as a prosecutor was far less impressive. Years before AIG collapsed and sought a federal bailout, a Spitzer lawsuit forced the ouster of chief executive Maurice "Hank" Greenberg, who had spent decades building the company. Eight years later, the suit has gone nowhere. (Among the prominent individuals targeted by Attorney General Spitzer was Washington Examiner owner Phil Anschutz. The case was settled out of court.)

Spitzer also selectively targeted individuals based on their political affiliation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Eliot Spitzer's Comeback Is More Scary Than Tawdry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.