OBIT - HASH Nena Hale

The Roanoke Times (Roanoke, VA), August 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

OBIT - HASH Nena Hale


HASH

Nena Hale

Nena Hale Hash departed this life August 1, 2013, surrounded by her loving husband Kelly, her sisters, and nieces. She was born February 20, 1920, the daughter of the late William Lee and Florence Patton Hale of Galax. In 1942, she married Kelly G. Hash, and to this union were born two daughters, Diana Kay and Sharon Kelly.

Nena was preceded in death by her infant daughters, her sisters, Katy Hale Laffoon and Peggy Sue Hale and her brothers Robert McCawley Hale and Randolph Hudson Hale.

She is survived by her husband, Kelly Hash; sisters, Helen H. Compton, of Galax, Aileene H. Hale of Galax, and Jama Lois H. Layne, of Radford; nieces Sherry C. Leonard and Shannon C. Reynolds, of Lynchburg, Kay Laffoon, of Mooresville, N.C., Kimberly H. Chiapetto, of Floyd, and Elizabeth H. Christy of Greensboro, N.C.; nephews, Michael Compton, of Palmer, Alaska, Miles Compton, of Galax, Mark Layne, of Christiansburg, and Jason Hale of Parksley; eight great- nieces and nephews and one great-great-niece.

At the age of 16, Nena graduated as valedictorian at Galax High School and entered Kentucky Christian University, Grayson, Kentucky the same year, where she completed three years Bible Studies and fine arts. She then transferred to Transylvania University in Lexington, Ky., where she received the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in English and history and minors in psychology and German. She received the master's degree in education from the University of Virginia. She completed more than 30 graduate hours beyond the master's degree from the University of Louisville and the University of Virginia.

During her 42 year career, Nena taught students from first grade through college level. She began her teaching career returning to her Grayson County home and teaching at Pisgah, a one-room school housing about 50 students in grades first through seventh. She was 20 years old, and some of her students were almost as old as she and certainly some of the boys were bigger and taller. She walked or rode her bicycle to school and was responsible for building the fires and cleaning the school. Her next assignment was Bridle Creek School where they had grades first through ninth. Students then went to high school at Independence. She taught at Bridle Creek for three years and then in Independence until 1953. At that time she came to Galax, where she taught English, United States History, and speech and served as a teacher-counselor. For approximately 15 years, she was a full-time guidance counselor at Galax High School.

Nena taught classes in public speaking and English for Wytheville Community College and taught graduate courses in guidance for the University of Virginia. She was also a licensed professional counselor in the Commonwealth of Virginia. At UVA she became a member of Kappa Delta Pi, national honor society in education, and was a member of Alpha Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society, an International honor society for outstanding women educators.

Nena served three terms as president of the Grayson County Education Association and one term as president of the Galax Education Association. She was a member of numerous committees of the Virginia Education Association and was chairman of the Guidance Committee of the Virginia Education Association in 1964.

Nena was a member of the New River Valley Personnel and Guidance Association, the Virginia Counselor's Association, the American School Counselor's Association, the American Personnel and Guidance Association, and the National Vocational Guidance Association. …

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