The New York Bump; News, Weather and Sports; Hey, New York. Keep It to Yourself

By Horrigan, Kevin | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 11, 2013 | Go to article overview

The New York Bump; News, Weather and Sports; Hey, New York. Keep It to Yourself


Horrigan, Kevin, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Back in mid-July, when New York City suffered through seven consecutive days an entire week! of 90-degree-plus high temperatures, a report on National Public Radio disclosed that some New Yorkers were taking dramatic measures: showering right before bed and letting the kids play in sprinklers.

As someone who grew up in Houston before air-conditioning was common and who now lives in St. Louis, I thought, "Wow. What courage. What ingenuity. What pluck."

Nah.

I thought, "Why is this on the national news? So what? It's hot in New York. People in hotter parts of the country (which is to say most of them) know what to do when the weather gets hot. You just sound stupid."

Then again, I work for a newspaper that prints "hot weather tips" like "eat light, cool, easily digested meals, wear a hat and dress in loose, lightweight and light-colored clothes made of natural fibers, limit activity in the middle of the day, bathe or shower frequently in cool water."

I'm all for public service, but who reads those lists? "Hey, Earl. Hold off on the sweatshirt. It says here you should take a bath in cool water and put on a hat and some light-weight clothes made of natural fibers."

It gets hot. You deal with it. Not in New York. New York shares it with the rest of America.

New York is a special place. It contains approximately 90 percent of the nation's opinion-makers. More important, it contains the bosses of those opinion-makers.

Key rule of journalism: News increases in importance in direct proportion to its proximity to the editor affected. If an editor hits a pothole on the way into work, be prepared to write a pothole story.

If people are hot in New York, you'll hear about it in Okmulgee, Okla. If it snows a foot in Omaha, Neb., it's winter. If it snows a foot in New York, it is a cataclysm. This is true not only in news and weather, but especially in sports.

The New York Yankees are the favorite baseball team of most opinion-shapers, so you hear way more about the New York Yankees than the other 29 teams in Major League Baseball. The only exceptions are the New York Mets, in the infrequent years when they are good, and the Boston Red Sox, who are the blood-rivals of the Yankees and the second-favorite team in the East Coast megalopolis.

It makes no difference if the Yankees are just slightly better than a .

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The New York Bump; News, Weather and Sports; Hey, New York. Keep It to Yourself
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.