New York Museum Shows Civil War Artifacts; 'Empire for the Union' Will Be a Permanent Exhibit Detailing the State's Long Military History

By Carola, Chris | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 11, 2013 | Go to article overview

New York Museum Shows Civil War Artifacts; 'Empire for the Union' Will Be a Permanent Exhibit Detailing the State's Long Military History


Carola, Chris, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. * In 1863, the first items from Civil War battlefields where New Yorkers were fighting and dying started to arrive at the newly created Bureau of Military Statistics in Albany. Among them were a uniform button and the bullet that struck it at the Battle of Cedar Mountain in Virginia.

Thousands of artifacts and 150 years later, more than 100 of those relics including the damaged button and bullet are being displayed in a new exhibit at the New York State Military Museum as part of the Empire State's commemoration of the war's sesquicentennial.

The exhibit, "Empire for Union," officially opened July 27 at the museum in downtown Saratoga Springs and will be a permanent part of the museum, which tells New York's military history from the Revolutionary War to the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

New York provided the most soldiers, supplies and funding and suffered the most casualties of any state North and South that fought in the war, according to museum curator Courtney Burns. Nearly 40,000 New Yorkers fell during the war.

"The thing we wanted to do was to highlight New York's role in the war and the war's impact on the state," Burns said at the museum, housed in a former state armory in this resort town 25 miles north of Albany.

The exhibit details New York's role chronologically, focusing on a major battle from each year, such as Gettysburg, fought 150 years ago this summer.

Of the 94,000 Union soldiers who participated in the three-day Battle of Gettysburg, more than 23,000 were New Yorkers. According to the museum, the Union's first shots were fired by a trooper in the 9th New York Cavalry. Another trooper from the unit, Cpl. Cyrus James, was the first Yankee to die when he was hit by Confederate fire during a skirmish early on July 1. …

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