Neolithic People Didn't Eat like Cavemen, Ate Spiced Fish and Meat

By Barber, Elizabeth | The Christian Science Monitor, August 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Neolithic People Didn't Eat like Cavemen, Ate Spiced Fish and Meat


Barber, Elizabeth, The Christian Science Monitor


About 4,000 years ago, the Egyptians plied the Red Sea with boats loaded with exotic spices bought from Arabian trading partners who spun fantastic tales of pilfering the prized goods from winged monsters roosting at jagged mountain tops. Some 500 years ago, Christopher Columbus readied his boat and set out on a journey just as dangerous as those the ancient Arabs told of, sailing across the Atlantic in search of a new route to ferry Asia's cinnamon and pepper and cloves to Europe.

Spices are the mark of empires, of cultural sophistication and of cosmopolitan commerce. But it turns out that spice use predates all that. In fact, as early as about 6,000 ago, Neolithic people added garlic mustard, a spice, to boiling meals of meat and fish, according to a new paper published in PLOS ONE. The research identifies the earliest known, definitive example of spice use in cooking, as well as revises popular culture's take on the Neolithic peoples as unrefined, tearing at meat and fish without a care for how it tastes.

"The finding of spice use by these people implies a much more sophisticated diet than many people have imagined," says Oliver Craig, lecturer in Archaeological Science at the University of York and a co-author on the paper. "We suggest that people's perception of food also encompassed an aesthetic dimension at this time."

Little is known for sure about the origins of spice use, since identifying it in ancient cooking is difficult. Plants disintegrate, and even when remnants remain, it's often unclear if ancient peoples were using the leaves for their flavor or for the added calories or nutritional value. Or, the seeds or flakes could be have been carried there on wind gust or an animal's muzzle. …

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