Andean Churches Plagued by Art Thieves; Thefts of Precious Art Grow More Brazen as Collectors Zero in on Ecclesiastical Art

By Frank Bajak; Paola Flores | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Andean Churches Plagued by Art Thieves; Thefts of Precious Art Grow More Brazen as Collectors Zero in on Ecclesiastical Art


Frank Bajak; Paola Flores, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


LA PAZ, Bolivia * The thieves tunneled under the thick walls of the colonial-era Roman Catholic church in the tiny southern Bolivian town of San Miguel de Tomave, emerged through the floor and made off with five 18th-century oil paintings .

It was the third time the highlands church had been plundered of sacred art since 2007. Most of the finely etched silver that once graced its altar already was gone.

"Who would have thought they would take the canvases, too?" the Rev. Francisco Dubert, the parish priest, asked of the oils depicting the Virgin Mary.

Increasingly bold thefts plague colonial churches in remote Andean towns in Bolivia and Peru, where authorities say cultural treasures are disappearing at an alarming rate. At least nine churches have been hit this year in the two culturally rich but economically poor countries.

"We think the thefts are being done on behalf of collectors," said the Rev. Salvador Piniero, archbishop of Peru's highlands Ayacucho province.

Religious and cultural authorities say criminal bands are stealing "to order" for foreigners.

Bolivian churches have been robbed 38 times of 447 objects since 2009 of highly stylized decorative silverwork, canvases, polished gold and silver altar pieces and gem-encrusted jewelry, said the country's cultural patrimony chief, Lupe Meneses.

In Peru, at least 30 thefts from churches and chapels have been reported since January 2012, including two in August: Churches in Ayacucho and Puno provinces were robbed of ornamental silver laminate, gold and silver crowns, earrings and necklaces.

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