Lack of Science Literacy Helps Global Warmists Spread Their Gospel

By Arnold, Ron | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, December 19, 2013 | Go to article overview

Lack of Science Literacy Helps Global Warmists Spread Their Gospel


Arnold, Ron, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Would it make any difference to the public whether the climate gurus in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are right or wrong about dangerous human-caused global warming if only a weak minority of Americans knew what carbon dioxide is? Or what the carbon in their carbon footprint is? Or that their own body is built with carbon-based molecules? Or what a molecule is?

Answer: No. That "if" is the real state of science literacy in the United States, according to nearly two decades of National Academy of Sciences studies. Most of us don't know any of those things, nor does most of the world, for that matter, says an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development 2008 survey.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change can say anything it wants because only a literate minority is listening, much of which is listening with its attitudes and emotions and really, really wants catastrophic global warming to happen, as a number of IPCC scientists admit of themselves in private.

If the IPCC believers sound a bit like excitement-starved teenagers, that might be explained by the fact that literacy studies tend to focus on "what is learned by the time a student graduates from high school," when learning contains fewer chemistry and physics courses than it does raging hormones and dominance fights.

College graduates aren't much better. Universities seem to indoctrinate more than educate, which probably helps whip up educated ignorance into the brand of fear marketed by IPCC scientists.

The United States National Center for Education Statistics tells us that "scientific literacy is the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs, and economic productivity."

We're not inundated with that. Popular culture has no clue or care what scientists say anyway, and pop types probably think that IPCC is a new street drug. …

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