GED Switching to Tougher, Computer-Based Tests in January

By Jones, Barbara | Pasadena Star-News, December 25, 2013 | Go to article overview

GED Switching to Tougher, Computer-Based Tests in January


Jones, Barbara, Pasadena Star-News


Known for decades as a second chance for dropouts, the popular high-school equivalency test known as the GED is about to undergo a historic overhaul to better prepare adult learners for college or the workforce.

Beginning Jan. 2, the company that administers the General Educational Development test will jettison the paper-and-pencil exams and the multiple-choice questions that rely on rote memorization. Instead, adult learners will have to demonstrate computer and critical-thinking skills in a series of online assessments covering literacy, math, science and social studies.

The new exam has been updated and improved four times over the years, but this latest upgrade is being touted by GED executives as the most significant and far-reaching.

"GED Testing Service has built a new comprehensive program - not just a new test - that will ensure that adults have the skills they need to be prepared for jobs and also for essential college and career programs," said company President Randy Trask.

In addition to the change in format, the 2014 test will be aligned with the more rigorous math and English standards taking effect next fall at public schools around the country. Testing officials said they wanted to ensure the GED certificate carries the same value in every state while remaining on par with the diplomas being awarded to today's high school graduates.

The overhauled GED also includes a new scoring system that helps adult learners determine whether they're ready to enroll in college- level courses or pursue training for a higher-level job.

Despite the improvements, its $120 cost will be significantly less for most California test-takers, many of whom had to pay $200 or more, depending on the school district where they took the test.

Districts like Los Angeles Unified, where GED preparation classes are a key component of Adult Education programs, are beefing up their lessons so students will be ready to take the more rigorous equivalency exams.

"We know that the new GED is based on the Common Core, and we have been working on revising our curriculum, including the GED preparation course," said Monica Balbuena, who has been chief examiner at the district's GED testing center for six years. "We are reviewing new preparation material and software that will allow our students training to prepare for a computerized assessment."

Linda Bardere, a spokesman for San Bernardino City Unified, said the district has added a basic computer class to its curriculum so that adult learners will be prepared for the test.

The GED was launched in 1942 by the nonprofit American Council on Education to help returning World War II veterans jump-start their careers. It evolved over the years to become a lifeline for highs- school dropouts, with some 800,000 adult learners nationwide taking the test each year. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

GED Switching to Tougher, Computer-Based Tests in January
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.