Activistsdemand State Gov't Documents ; Want Information Regarding'dreamers,' Driver's Licenses

By Fischer, Howard | AZ Daily Star, December 31, 2013 | Go to article overview

Activistsdemand State Gov't Documents ; Want Information Regarding'dreamers,' Driver's Licenses


Fischer, Howard, AZ Daily Star


PHOENIX -- Challengers to Arizona's denial of driver's licenses to "dreamers" want internal documents and testimony -- perhaps even from Gov. Jan Brewer -- in their legal bid to prove her actions are illegal.

Attorney Victor Viramontes of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund contends the Brewer administration is improperly hiding behind claims of privilege to avoid answering questions about how she and the Department of Administration came up with the policy. He wants U.S. District Judge David Campbell to order both ADOT and Brewer's staffs to produce documents leading up to the policy change.

The move is getting a fight from the governor's lawyers.

In his own filings with the court, Douglas Northup, lead counsel for Brewer, charges that MALDEF has been "asking blatantly inappropriate questions aimed at invading the attorney-client privilege." He wants Campbell to rebuff Viramontes.

What the judge rules could determine the ultimate outcome of the case.

Viramontes said the question of whether those in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as "dreamers," are entitled to Arizona licenses goes beyond the simple issue of whether they are authorized by federal law to be in this country.

He pointed out that the lawsuit is based in large part on MALDEF's contention that Brewer and her staff decided ahead of time they wanted to deny licenses to DACA recipients, but wanted to do it in such a way that the policy change would not affect others in the country illegally. That, Viramontes said, would violate constitutional requirements to treat all people equally.

Earlier this year, Campbell said there appeared to be some basis for that equal-protection claim. So ADOT again altered the policy in a way that Viramontes argues was similarly designed mainly to keep licenses out of the hands of DACA recipients.

"Under the equal-protection analysis, your motivation is one of the key factors that you have to evaluate to figure out if they're discriminating," he said. "By denying us this discovery, they're keeping us from proving our case."

Viramontes wants internal memos and emails between ADOT and Brewer staff members exchanged ahead of the policy changes. And he wants those involved in changing the policy to answer questions about how it came about.

So far, Viramontes has questioned ADOT Director John Halikowski and several others. He said, however, that it may become necessary to take a deposition from Brewer herself.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Activistsdemand State Gov't Documents ; Want Information Regarding'dreamers,' Driver's Licenses
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.