The Problem with Barack Obama's Foreign Policy Is Barack Obama

By Hoskinson, Charles | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, April 28, 2014 | Go to article overview

The Problem with Barack Obama's Foreign Policy Is Barack Obama


Hoskinson, Charles, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Former Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis brought an old Greek saying into the political lexicon: "The fish rots from the head down."

It's the perfect metaphor for what passes for foreign policy in the Obama administration.

Facing increasing criticism of his handling of foreign relations, President Obama on Monday knocked down an entire infield's worth of straw men in a 949-word baseball-themed defense at a news conference in Manila, the last stop on a weeklong Asia trip. It's a good primer for the uninitiated on exactly how far out of touch the commander- in-chief is with the world scene:

Well, Ed, I doubt that I'm going to have time to lay out my entire foreign policy doctrine. And there are actually some complimentary pieces as well about my foreign policy, but I'm not sure you ran them.

Here's I think the general takeaway from this trip. Our alliances in the Asia Pacific have never been stronger; I can say that unequivocally. Our relationship with ASEAN countries in Southeast Asia have never been stronger. I don't think that's subject to dispute. As recently as a decade ago, there were great tensions between us and Malaysia, for example. And I think you just witnessed the incredible warmth and strength of the relationship between those two countries.

We're here in the Philippines signing a defense agreement. Ten years ago, fifteen years ago there was enormous tensions around our defense relationship with the Philippines. And so it's hard to square whatever it is that the critics are saying with facts on the ground, events on the ground here in the Asia Pacific region. Typically, criticism of our foreign policy has been directed at the failure to use military force. And the question I think I would have is, why is it that everybody is so eager to use military force after we've just gone through a decade of war at enormous costs to our troops and to our budget? And what is it exactly that these critics think would have been accomplished?

My job as Commander-in-Chief is to deploy military force as a last resort, and to deploy it wisely. And, frankly, most of the foreign policy commentators that have questioned our policies would go headlong into a bunch of military adventures that the American people had no interest in participating in and would not advance our core security interests.

So if you look at Syria, for example, our interest is in helping the Syrian people, but nobody suggests that us being involved in a land war in Syria would necessarily accomplish this goal. And I would note that those who criticize our foreign policy with respect to Syria, they themselves say, no, no, no, we don't mean sending in troops. Well, what do you mean? Well, you should be assisting the opposition -- well, we're assisting the opposition. What else do you mean? Well, perhaps you should have taken a strike in Syria to get chemical weapons out of Syria. Well, it turns out we're getting chemical weapons out of Syria without having initiated a strike. So what else are you talking about? And at that point it kind of trails off.

In Ukraine, what we've done is mobilize the international community. Russia has never been more isolated. A country that used to be clearly in its orbit now is looking much more towards Europe and the West, because they've seen that the arrangements that have existed for the last 20 years weren't working for them. And Russia is having to engage in activities that have been rejected uniformly around the world. And we've been able to mobilize the international community to not only put diplomatic pressure on Russia, but also we've been able to organize European countries who many were skeptical would do anything to work with us in applying sanctions to Russia. Well, what else should we be doing? Well, we shouldn't be putting troops in, the critics will say. That's not what we mean. Well, okay, what are you saying? Well, we should be arming the Ukrainians more. …

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