How Green Is Your School? ; Management Courses Teaching Sustainability, in and outside of Class

By Schuetze, Christopher F | International Herald Tribune, March 27, 2013 | Go to article overview

How Green Is Your School? ; Management Courses Teaching Sustainability, in and outside of Class


Schuetze, Christopher F, International Herald Tribune


A growing number of graduate-level management courses are teaching sustainability, in and out of the classroom.

One of the reasons that Layla El Zein, a successful telecommunications engineer in Lebanon, decided to go to business school was that she was interested in turning her charity work into a full-time job.

"I felt that I had much more to give than volunteering," she said. She chose the Rotterdam School of Management at Erasmus University partly because of its M.B.A. program's focus on sustainability. "Their sustainability initiatives are really clear and tough, and they prioritize it," she said.

As a student in the program, she was able to secure an internship with Oxfam in the Netherlands, where she is working to test the feasibility of impact investment.

Whether because of increased student demand or new hiring strategies among employers, business schools are paying greater attention to environmental issues. And while they are integrating sustainability into their curriculums, experts debate how these topics should be best taught, both inside and outside the classroom.

"There are a growing number of programs that say that they train students in sustainability," said Nancy McGaw, deputy director of the Business and Society Program at the Aspen Institute, which until recently published a comprehensive MBA ranking focused on social and environmental impact

The ranking, which Aspen stopped compiling in March, listed the top five as Stanford; York University, in Toronto; IE University, in Madrid; Notre Dame, in Indiana; and Yale. Rotterdam was No.19.

The China Europe International Business School, also known as Ceibs, has been formally integrating sustainability into its curriculum since 2009. Before that, the subject played a part in student extracurriculars, said Lydia Price, a professor of marketing at the school. The curriculum is designed to educate students on the problems faced by business and society.

"We introduce them to some of the problems China has with water and air," Dr. Price said by telephone. "The first goal is to raise awareness."

Teaching practical skills is just as important as awareness, she said, adding that "even if they are aware and well-intentioned, they can end up making decisions that end up hurting the environment."

Ms. El Zein, the Rotterdam student, worries that while sustainability is taught in the classroom, it is not taken as seriously in the real workplace. "Not enough is being done about it after business school," she said.

An awareness of sustainability issues is important for all businesses students, regardless of their field, said Maryke Luijendijk-Steenkamp, M.B.A. marketing and admissions director for the Rotterdam School of Management.

"Even students who are looking at hard-core finance, increasingly they need a business degree that is reflective of the global business landscape," she said.

As part of an optional course, the school takes students to the Bergplaas farm in South Africa, where they spend a week learning about sustainable business.

A problem in teaching sustainability is defining the subject, said Ms. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Green Is Your School? ; Management Courses Teaching Sustainability, in and outside of Class
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.