Dr. Grady Bogue, Higher Education Leader, Dies

News Sentinel, October 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Dr. Grady Bogue, Higher Education Leader, Dies


Dr. Grady Bogue, a longtime university administrator, professor and author, died Wednesday at home after being diagnosed in June with colon cancer.

He was 77.

Dr. Bogue most recently served as interim chancellor of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga after having retired from UT's Knoxville campus, where he served as a professor of leadership and policy studies for a dozen years. Before coming to Knoxville, Dr. Bogue served 11 years as chancellor of Louisiana State University-Shreveport, and was named chancellor emeritus. He also served one year as interim chancellor of LSU in Baton Rouge.

Dr. Bogue wrote the "On Leadership" column for the Greater Knoxville Business Journal until his illness, authored 11 books and published more than 60 articles in higher education journals.

He served as a consultant on planning and evaluation, assessment and accreditation, and leadership and governance to colleges and universities, state agencies and corporations. During his American Council fellowship year and the following five years with the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Dr. Bogue directed the Performance Funding Project, which designed and implemented the first state-level performance incentive policy in American higher education, a policy now in its 30th year.

Keith Carver, executive assistant to University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro, studied under Dr. …

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