Even Those Who Dislike Police Will Be Horrified ; CRIME PSYCHOLOGY LECTURER

By Berry, Mike | Manchester Evening News, September 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

Even Those Who Dislike Police Will Be Horrified ; CRIME PSYCHOLOGY LECTURER


Berry, Mike, Manchester Evening News


THERE are a number of reasons why a wanted suspect would be able to hide within their local community without any obvious fear of the police - despite a Pounds 50,000 reward on offer for those helping the authorities to capture him.

One reason is the fear of retaliation from the suspect and possibly others associated with them and that they or their families could be in danger if they are identified and labelled as 'grasses'.

Until Tuesday, many people in these areas would be unconcerned about one criminal murdering or maiming another, but if 'civilians' or unarmed policewoman are being killed, then it's a different matter.

There is an acceptance in some quarters that it is okay for one criminal to do damage to another, and, as long as it doesn't affect others, it will not be reported to the police.

This is more likely where there is an anti-police attitude, which prevails in some communities in Manchester, where there is, unfortunately, a high acceptance of criminality.

Often the attitude crosses generations, where individuals learn to trust the police when their parents are positive about the police.

But you are more likely to adopt such negative attitudes when parents are derogative of police and authority.

If people are disenfranchised and living in areas with high levels of joblessness and limited opportunities, then crime is seen as the way out.

There is no doubt that there is also some sort of hero-worship among a minority of people, as seen in the awful statements made by internet trolls regarding the death of the two police officers. …

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