Frankie Lances One Last Boyle ; It Is the End of the Road for the Outrageous Comedian

Manchester Evening News, September 14, 2012 | Go to article overview

Frankie Lances One Last Boyle ; It Is the End of the Road for the Outrageous Comedian


FOR those who've enjoyed Frankie Boyle's caustic, cynical and occasionally nauseating wit since he first gained a national platform on Mock The Week in 2005, news that he's heading out on his last tour will be greeted with a disappointed sigh.

But those same people will be pleased to know that Boyle is going out in characteristically ungracious style by calling his show The Last Days Of Sodom and promising to 'heal Britain's fools [and] support its rioters' with a set full of grim and grotesque observations on Broken Britain.

It's really no surprise; check out Boyle's Wikipedia entry and the editorial on controversies is just as long as the potted history of his career, with everything from disability to the Royal family being subjected to his ire.

He was berated in the tabloids for his verbal assault on swimmer Rebecca Adlington, then newly-crowned Olympic champion, and he's even braved a few lines about the humanitarian issues and political tensions between Palestine and Israel.

One gag in his Channel 4 series, Tramadol Nights, even prompted a response from the chairman of the House of Commons Culture, Media and Sport select committee. "People have to be horrified," Boyle told The Guardian newspaper about the incident. "No one can have indifference and ennui.

"I am a comic, that is my job. I am not serving you gammon in a supermarket. My job is to take those words and use them in a way that makes them a bit more worthwhile.

"You would think politicians would have better things to discuss in the middle of three wars and an economic collapse."

Some critics have branded him uber-offensive, others defend his provocative approach by claiming he's just the man unafraid to say the things we're all thinking. …

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