Civil Rights Panel Sets Immigration Meeting in State

By Beyerle, Dana | The Tuscaloosa News, July 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

Civil Rights Panel Sets Immigration Meeting in State


Beyerle, Dana, The Tuscaloosa News


MONTGOMERY | The U.S. Civil Rights Commission plans a meeting in Alabama this summer to survey the impact of immigration laws and their effect on civil rights.

The commission said it will meet Aug. 17, probably in Birmingham. The panel will include state officials, local law enforcement officials, the U.S. Department of Justice, people who believe their civil rights have been affected by immigration laws, scholars, advocacy groups and members of the commission's state advisory groups, the commission said in a statement.

The commission said it will look at whether recently enacted state immigration enforcement laws -- such as Alabama's -- discriminate, cause hate crimes, increase racial and ethnic profiling, diminish immigrant student rights and compromise public safety and community policing.

"I'm pleased that my fellow commissioners, in a unanimous and bipartisan fashion, voted to conduct this important inquiry on issues not addressed by the U.S. Supreme Court in its present decision," commission chairman Martin R. Castro said.

The date of the hearing probably means it will be conducted after the 11th U.S. Court of Appeals rules in the lawsuit over Alabama's immigration law, which was patterned after Arizona's.

The U.S. Supreme Court last week threw out three parts of Arizona's law, but kept a provision much like Alabama's that allows law enforcement agencies to question the immigration status of people who are stopped for other legitimate law enforcement reasons. The court said immigration policy is the purview of the federal government.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange said he expected the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to quickly rule on Alabama's law, now that it has the Supreme Court decision in Arizona's as a template.

State Sens. Scott Beason, R-Gardendale, and Bobby Singleton, D- Greensboro, said they have been asked to attend the commission meeting.

Beason was the co-author of Alabama's 2011 immigration law, which was re-tooled in 2012. Singleton is an outspoken opponent of the bill.

"My understanding is they want to hear both sides and the issues and realities of the law," Beason said.

Singleton said he plans to participate if his schedule isn't in conflict.

"If you look at the immigration law, it is racist and biased," Singleton said. "White immigrants of European descent can come into this country and be OK. We're looking at Mexican Latinos. They aren't looking at other ethic groups."

Gov. Robert Bentley signed the immigration bill into law.

"We would hope that this meeting would, indeed, fairly examine the issue of illegal immigration," said Jennifer Ardis, a spokeswoman for the governor. "However, I cannot speak to the purpose of this meeting as this is not a meeting we have organized. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Civil Rights Panel Sets Immigration Meeting in State
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.