Charting a Better Path

By Spalding, Matthew | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), June 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Charting a Better Path


Spalding, Matthew, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


A hundred years ago, the crew of Titanic learned just how difficult it can be to turn a great vessel. They spotted an iceberg and tried to turn the ship, but couldn't change course quickly enough to avoid a collision. A wonder of human engineering was doomed; not because of its design, but because of the way it was handled.

The 2012 elections could mark a similar turning point in American history. We see serious threats dead ahead: soaring federal debt, unsustainable entitlement programs, unaccountable bureaucrats.

This year we will decide if the country is to continue along the path of unlimited government, or whether we will begin a long, slow turn back toward the principles of limited constitutional government.

The United States is unique, a wonder of political design. Ours is a republic dedicated to the universal principles of human liberty: that all are created equal and equally endowed with unalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Our government exists to secure these God-given rights, and it derives its just powers from the consent of the governed. Our Constitution limits the power of government under the rule of law, creating a vigorous framework for expanding economic opportunity, protecting our independence, and securing liberty and justice for all.

Today, though, the federal government has acquired an all but unquestioned dominance over virtually every area of American life. The federal government increasingly regulates more and more of our most basic activities, from how much water is in our toilets to what kind of light bulbs we can buy. This is a government that is unlimited by any organizing principle, meddling in almost every facet of our lives.

Let us count the ways that Washington is ignoring its constitutional limits.

As part of his re-election campaign, President Obama has launched an effort called "We Can't Wait" to highlight steps he's taken to bypass Congress. Mr. Obama's idea seems to be that the president, charged with the execution of the laws, doesn't have to wait for the lawmaking branch to make, amend or abolish the laws -- that he can, and should, act on his own.

This violates the spirit, and potentially the letter, of the Constitution's separation of the legislative and executive powers of Congress and the president.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Charting a Better Path
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.