How 2 Liberation Movements Converged

By Norman, Tony | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), March 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

How 2 Liberation Movements Converged


Norman, Tony, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


The world-weary prophet who composed the book of Ecclesiastes said it true: "Be warned, my son, for writing books is endless, and much [reading] is a weariness of the flesh." Local writers aren't taking Ecclesiastes 12:12 seriously, though. If you've published a book in the last year, send a copy to: Tony Norman, Book Editor, Post-Gazette, 34 Blvd of the Allies. Pittsburgh, PA 15222. Please, no cookbooks, dream diaries, fake biographies or novels-in- progress. All genres are welcome. Include an Internet address.

* "Colored Cosmopolitanism: The Shared Struggle for Freedom in the United States and India" by Nico Slate (Harvard University Press). One of the most fascinating releases of 2012 was "Colored Cosmopolitanism," Nico Slate's exhaustive history of the ties between the American civil rights movement and India's inexorable march toward democracy from the 19th century through the 1960s. Mr. Slate is assistant professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University and appears to have assimilated every scrap of information about the liberation movements in both countries. He writes with authority about obscure and forgotten figures and events. The dialogue between African-Americans and South Asians chronicled in "Colored Cosmopolitanism" is one of the great untold stories of the 20th century. hup.harvard.edu

* "Amidst Traffic" by Michel Sauret (One Way Street). Writer Michel Sauret, a former PG photography intern, served as a public affairs specialist and journalist for the U.S. Army. But his first love appears to be short stories about broken people slouching toward some form of redemption. Mr. Sauret's characters are chatty, obsessed, violent, familiar and ghost-haunted. When they find hope, they are relieved to discover that it isn't just another four- letter word. onewaystreetproduction.com

* "In Self Defense" by Sam Nicotero (SAME Books). This is riveting true story of Willy Wetzel, an Indonesian martial artist who immigrated to Beaver County with his family in 1956. Willy opened one of the nation's first martial arts schools and taught his son, Roy, everything he knew. When Roy came back from Vietnam many years later, father and son couldn't reconnect. One night, their mutual brooding led to an argument. Father and son found themselves in a no-holds barred fight to the death. After the bloody conflict, Roy was put on trial for murder, a strange saga that Pittsburgh- based writer/actor Sam Nicotero documents. Some old-timers may even remember this story. …

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