Schools, Firms Looking at a Two-Year Law Degree

By Mondics, Chris | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), March 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Schools, Firms Looking at a Two-Year Law Degree


Mondics, Chris, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates?

The idea is gaining traction among academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients.

"I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris LLP.

Mr. Bonovitz, who focuses on corporate and tax law, has become a vocal advocate for law schools offering a two-year option or, absent that, a three-year program more intensely focused on actual business and problem-solving skills that lawyers need when they start work.

Ballard Spahr LLP chairman Mark Stewart said law firms already make judgments about their hires in the second year of law school, when a select few are invited to work as summer interns. Those interns typically are made offers at the end of the summer apprenticeship -- quite apart from what they might learn in the third year.

"Law firms are making their assessment on how a person thinks, how we think they can interact with clients and their peers," Mr. Stewart said

At least one prominent law school dean has added his voice for creating a two-year option. Daniel B. Rodriguez, dean of the law school at Northwestern University, said that option could lower costs for students and force law schools to improve the third year as an incentive to get students to stay.

But many other academics think such a move would be a precipitate and unwise response to a complex problem.

"Of all the ideas that I have heard I think that is the worst one," said Adam Scales, associate dean, Rutgers School of Law in Camden, N.J. "You will have people who are less qualified than three- year students."

Spurred by a sharp downturn in the legal market in 2009, lawyers and legal educators across the country are enmeshed in a ticklish -- and at times painful -- debate about how young lawyers are trained.

In 2007, when the legal economy still was strong, big firms were hiring large numbers of graduates and the top salary for a lawyer fresh out of law school was $145,000 in Philadelphia, and as high as $165,000 in New York and Washington. …

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