Marking a Graying Legacy Ted Page, a Scrappy Negro Leagues Player on the Homestead Grays and the Pittsburgh Crawfords, Will Be Honored with a Grave Marker

By Brooks, Kelton | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), August 17, 2013 | Go to article overview

Marking a Graying Legacy Ted Page, a Scrappy Negro Leagues Player on the Homestead Grays and the Pittsburgh Crawfords, Will Be Honored with a Grave Marker


Brooks, Kelton, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


One of the most feared and aggressive base runners in the history of the Negro League has finally reached home.

A dedication will be held this morning at the Allegheny Cemetery to mark the grave of Theodore Roosevelt "Terrible Ted" Page, a member of both the Pittsburgh Crawfords and Homestead Grays in the early 1930s.

Page was found dead in his Hill District home in 1984, beaten with a baseball bat. He was 81.

His attacker was Jeffrey Sullivan, a 20-year-old who did yard work for Page and claimed Page owed him money. He was convicted of second-degree murder and is serving a life sentence.

"That was possibly the most devastating day of my life," said Adrienne Dunning, Page's niece. "The very thing that gave him so much life and energy was used to take his life."

For 27 years, Page's cremated ashes were thought to be lost. Ms. Dunning said they were found in a community cellar at the Lawrenceville cemetery, where her uncle had raised money to mark the grave of former teammate Josh Gibson, "the Black Babe Ruth."

Orchestrating the ceremony for Page is Jeremy Krock, an anesthesiologist from Peoria, Ill., and coordinator of the Negro Leagues Baseball Grave Marker Project.

In 2004, he visited the grave of Negro Leaguer Jimmie Crutchfield in Burr Oak Cemetery in Illinois and noticed the grave was without a headstone.

From then, he began raising money to buy headstones for unmarked graves of Negro League players. The project has placed 30 headstones over the past 10 years with help from the Society for American Baseball Research.

Mr. Krock said his goal is to mark as many graves as possible. …

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