Paul Filibusters Brennan Nomination, Senate Delays Vote

By Starks, Tim | Roll Call, March 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

Paul Filibusters Brennan Nomination, Senate Delays Vote


Starks, Tim, Roll Call


Sen. Rand Paul began an old-fashioned filibuster of CIA director nominee John O. Brennan Wednesday, taking to the floor to protest the Obama administration's stance over whether the U.S. government can conduct targeted killings of suspected terrorists on U.S. soil.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., offered a consent agreement to hold a cloture vote after 90 more minutes of debate but Paul objected, although he suggested he might end his filibuster if the Obama administration would acknowledge it does not have the authority to order drone strikes in the United States.

Reid brushed off that request. "Everyone should plan on coming in tomorrow. We're through for the night," he said. Reid did not file for cloture, however. Brennan does appear to have enough support to surmount a 60-vote threshold to invoke cloture and clear his nomination.

"I will speak until I can no longer speak," the Kentucky Republican vowed as he began his effort shortly before noon. Under current Senate practice, a filibuster no longer requires continual speaking as it once did.

On Tuesday, Paul disclosed two letters he had received from the Obama administration in response to his questions over whether it has the power to conduct targeted killings on U. …

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Paul Filibusters Brennan Nomination, Senate Delays Vote
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